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Mar/Apr 2014 Issue

AAA helping shoppers find “green” cars

Consumers looking to “go green” and lessen their environmental impact through vehicle ownership have a new resource in AAA’s Green Car Guide, available at AAA.com.

Designed to help consumers find efficient vehicles that best fit their needs, the publication enables users to search vehicles based on criteria such as fuel economy and type of powertrain. It also provides a “Green Leaf” rating that takes into account real-world factors such as comfort, performance, and cargo space.

The guide is at AAA.com/green. Also in the automotive section at AAA.com are a number of other vehicle research tools, such as crash test data.

leaf and key


 

Survey: Motorists know speeding is dangerous but do it anyway

At a time when speeding-related deaths account for nearly a third of all traffic fatalities each year, taking close to 10,000 lives nationwide, a new survey found that one in five drivers admits to “get where I am going as fast as I can.”

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s National Survey of Speeding Attitudes and Behavior found that nearly half of all drivers surveyed say speeding is a problem. An overwhelming majority, 91 percent, agreed with the statement that “everyone should obey the speed limits because it’s the law.”

Yet despite acknowledging the safety benefits of speed limits, more than a quarter of those surveyed admitted “speeding is something I do without thinking” and “I enjoy the feeling of driving fast.” And 16 percent felt that “driving over the speed limit is not dangerous for skilled drivers.”

Of those surveyed, male drivers admitted to speeding more than females. Also, drivers with the least experience, 16–20 years old, admitted to speeding more frequently than any other age group. More than one in 10 drivers age 16–20 reported at least one speeding-related crash in the past five years, compared to 4 percent for the population as a whole.

 

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