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September/October 2015 Issue

Careful driving safeguards students

The school year has begun and as children take to the streets, their morning and afternoon commutes can be dangerous. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, one-fifth of all children 14 and younger who die in motor vehicle crashes are pedestrians.

To prevent this from happening, AAA encourages motorists through its annual School’s Open–Drive Carefully campaign to stay alert in areas where children are present, including school zones, neighborhoods, playgrounds, and around school buses. Children are often distracted or are unable to accurately judge traffic situations, so it’s vital that motorists keep this in mind and focus solely on the act of driving.

AAA cautions that having a heightened sense of awareness of children and following these practices will help to keep children safe:

  • Slow down in or near school and residential areas, and remember the law about stopping for school buses that are loading and unloading.
  • Every vehicle has blind spots. Check for children on the sidewalk, driveway, and around your car before slowly backing up.
  • Come to a complete stop. Research shows that more than one-third of drivers roll through stop signs in school zones or neighborhoods.



 

Mileage ratings often exceed promised mpg

While one-in-three Americans do not believe that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) new vehicle window sticker accurately reflects the fuel economy they achieve when driving, a AAA study found real-world fuel economy generally exceeds automaker promises.

AAA engineers conducted an analysis of 37,000 records submitted to the EPA–representing more than 8,400 vehicle make, model, and year combinations–to identify trends in real-world fuel economy. Surprisingly, among the self-reported data, eight out of 10 drivers reported fuel economy that was higher than the combined city/highway EPA mileage rating for their vehicle.



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